Jessica Brown: Celtic Christianity and the gift of thresholds

The Cliffs of Moher are in County Clare, Ireland, where the author lives. Bigstock/Redwallsky By Jessica Brown Writer FacebookTwitterEmailPrint   The spiritual practices of Celtic Christianity include an appreciation for thresholds — those literal and metaphorical crossing points that can serve as designated spaces or times to open to God, says a writer living in Ireland. … Continue reading “Jessica Brown: Celtic Christianity and the gift of thresholds”

Trillium and wild rose

By Wayne Holst July 13, 2018 Photo: Shutterstock My partner, Marlene, was thrilled to see her first trillium (Ontario’s provincial flower) while we hiked the Peck Lake Trail in Algonquin Provincial Park during late May of this year. When we holiday in my home province, we usually travel during the fall season, but this year … Continue reading “Trillium and wild rose”

It’s time to recalibrate expectations for clergy

By Nathan Kirkpatrick Managing director, Leadership Education at Duke Divinity FacebookTwitterEmailPrint   Denominations and congregations have based their expectations on full-time, paid ministry — and yet the trend is toward part-time, bivocational and unpaid clergy. Tuesday, August 5, 2014   Earlier this year, I taught an introductory parish leadership class to 40 part-time local church pastors. … Continue reading “It’s time to recalibrate expectations for clergy”

Living in sacred time, in our ordinary days

Bigstock/amok By Gretchen E. Ziegenhals Managing director, Leadership Education at Duke Divinity FacebookTwitterEmailPrint   In this secular world, what are the ways in which our Christian institutions can continue to help root us in our faith? Tuesday, July 15, 2014 As a child, I lived in what I now know was sacred time. I attended Grace … Continue reading “Living in sacred time, in our ordinary days”

Do you know whose land you’re on?

By Tali Folkins June 14, 2018 Indigenous-themed banners hang on the façade of the new Centre for Indigenous Peoples, directly across the street from Parliament Hill. The City of Ottawa and Parliament Hill are on unceded Algonquin territory. Photo: Paul McKinnon/Shutterstock   Beginning a service or other gathering with an Indigenous territorial acknowledgment can serve … Continue reading “Do you know whose land you’re on?”