Institutions

Abbey of Gethsemani
3642 Monks Rd
Trappist NY 40051,     USA

P: (502) 549-3117
F: (502) 549-4124
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Abbey of Gethsemani:


The Abbey of Gethsemani was home to the internationally known member of the community, Thomas Merton. Known in the religious community as Father Louis, he was a Trappist monk of the Cistercian Abbey of Gethsemani near Bardstown, Kentucky.


The Tradition:

Hospitality maintains a prominence in the living monastic tradition. As outlined in Saint Benedict's Rule for Monasteries, the guest represents Christ and has a claim on the welcome and care of the community. The Abbey of Gethsemani has received guests from the first days of its foundation in 1848.

Abbey retreats are silent, unstructured and undirected. Guests are welcome to participate in the Eucharist and hours of prayer.



The Legacy of Thomas Merton:

Thomas Merton, known in the monastery as Fr. Louis, was born on 31 January 1915 in Prades, southern France. The young Merton attended schools in France, England, and the United States. At Columbia University in New York City, he came under the influence of some remarkable teachers of literature, including Mark Van Doren, Daniel C. Walsh, and Joseph Wood Krutch. Merton entered the Catholic Church in 1938 in the wake of a rather dramatic conversion experience. Shortly afterward, he completed his master's thesis, "On Nature and Art in William Blake."

Following some teaching at Columbia University Extension and at St. Bonaventure's College, Olean, New York, Merton entered the monastic community of the Abbey of Gethsemani at Trappist, Kentucky, on 10 December 1941. He was received by Abbot Frederic Dunne who encouraged the young Frater Louis to translate works from the Cistercian tradition and to write historical biographies to make the Order better known.

The abbot also urged the young monk to write his autobiography, which was published under the title The Seven Story Mountain (1948) and became a best-seller and a classic. During the next 20 years, Merton wrote prolifically on a vast range of topics, including the contemplative life, prayer, and religious biographies. His writings would later take up controversial issues (e.g. social problems and Christian responsibility, race relations, violence, nuclear war, and economic injustice) and a developing ecumenical concern. He was one of the first Catholics to commend the great religions of the East to Roman Catholic Christians in the West.

Merton died by accidental electrocution in Bangkok, Thailand, while attending a meeting of religious leaders on 10 December 1968, just 27 years to the day after his entrance into the Abbey of Gethsemani.

Many esteem Thomas Merton as a spiritual master, a brillant writer, and a man who embodied the quest for God and for human solidarity. Since his death, many volumes by him have been published, including five volumes of his letters and seven of his personal journals. According to present count more than 60 titles of Merton's writings are in print in English, not including the numerous doctoral dissertations and books about the man, his life, and his writings.

Brother Patrick. OCSO


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