Archive for the ‘Links’ Category

Episcopal News Service launches French language service

Posted on: June 23rd, 2016 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Links

[ACNS, by Gavin Drake] The news service of the US-based Episcopal Church has launched a French language service to complement its existing English and Spanish provision.

Through its new Actualités service – the French word for “news” – ENS will provide news and information for French speakers throughout the Episcopal Church and Anglican Communion.

“The Episcopal Church includes several dioceses where English is not the primary language, so it’s vital that we offer news and resources so that all Episcopalians may benefit from them,” Matthew Davies, an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service, said.

“We have been providing news in Spanish for several years, both as a resource to the Province IX Spanish-speaking dioceses and for the thriving Latino communities in the US. With the launch of Actualités, we are delighted to expand our service to Episcopalians in places such as Haiti, the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe and the approximately four million French-speaking Anglicans around the world.”

Actualités features news articles by the Episcopal News Service as well as press releases from the Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs and links to useful resources, such as the monthly radio program, Le Magazine Anglican.

It is the second non-English service operated by ENS. Spanish speakers are served by its Noticias service.

In addition to its online news services, ENS provides daily email newsletters in English, French, and Spanish.

  • The Anglican Communion News Service also provides a free daily email detailing the day’s stories. You can subscribe here.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Anglican Communion News Service,  Daily update from ACNS on Thursday 23 June 2016 

Welcoming the Stranger: Canadian Foodgrains Bank Worship Resource

Posted on: June 20th, 2016 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Links

Resources:

Welcoming the Stranger: Canadian Foodgrains Bank Worship Resource

 

Foodgrains Bank is a partnership of 15 Canadian churches and church-based agencies working together to end global hunger. PWRDF is a member.

 

PWRDF has partnered with the Canadian Foodgrains Bank to co-brand CFGB’s new worship resource, “Welcoming the Stranger.”  The resource is designed to help groups “pray, give, learn, and advocate on conflict, migration, refugees and food security.”  While designed to mark World Refugee Day on June 20, the resource can be used in part or in whole at any other time of the year.  The “Give” section of the resource features PWRDF’s food assistance work in South Sudan.  The resource is available for download in both a  full colour  and a black and white (text only) black and white (text only) format.

If you have any questions about this resource, please contact Suzanne Rumsey, Public Engagement Program Coordinator at [email protected].

[email protected][email protected]_____________________________________________________

The Primate’s World Relief and Development Fund Email Update–June  17, 2016

Roadmap for European Reformation 500th anniversary

Posted on: June 13th, 2016 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Links

Reformation 500th anniversary logo
Photo Credit: WCC

[World Council of Churches] A celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, called the ‘European Reformation Roadmap,’ will begin in November 2016 in Geneva, before touring across sites of significance through May 2017.

There will be activities in 67 cities in 18 countries, featuring a show truck — or “story-mobile” — travelling to different locations in Europe to support local events. The tour through Europe will start on 3 November in Geneva, the city of John Calvin, and now home to the head office of the World Council of Churches (WCC) and many other international organizations. The programme includes seminars, a panel discussion on peace and a digital exhibition.

The Revd Dr Emmanuel Fuchs, President of the Protestant Church in Geneva, says, “It is a great honour for us in the Protestant Church of Geneva (in partnership with the World Council of Churches, the Reformation Museum and the Federation of Swiss Protestant Churches) to launch this European tour of Reformation cities.”

“Geneva, certainly, is a key city in the Reformation,” Fuchs adds. “This Geneva stage of the tour gives us an opportunity, quite apart from its historical aspect, to emphasize Geneva’s open, ecumenical and multicultural character. A certain ‘spirit of Geneva’, a product of the Reformation, still permeates our city, beyond the churches.“

Fuchs concludes: “So, the rich, varied programme, intended not only for the friends of the churches, but also for the whole population, for passersby who want to have a look, will provide, among other things, an opportunity to celebrate with our many immigrant communities, an opportunity for our young people from different religions to meet one another and have discussions, or even for families to see a puppet show. We look forward to seeing you on the Reformation Bus.”

The culmination of the tour will be in central Germany, at the story-mobile’s final stop in Wittenberg, in time for a World Reformation Exhibition entitled ‘Gates of Freedom’. There, churches from around the world and civil society exhibitors will present their activities over the summer, illustrating what the Reformation set in motion and what it still means today.

For more details see website for more details: http://www.oikoumene.org/en/press-centre/events/european-reformation-roadmap-launch

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Anglican Communion News Service, Daily update from the ACNS on Monday 31st May 2016

Anglican World magazine showcases global church family

Posted on: June 13th, 2016 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Links

Anglican World Magazine
Photo Credit: ACNS

[ACNS by Rachel Farmer] The global family of the Anglican Communion in action is showcased in the latest edition of Anglican World out this week.

It features stories of churches working to tackle hardship, disease, injustice and homelessness. Writing in the magazine, Secretary General of the Anglican Communion, Archbishop Josiah Idowu-Fearon, said, “Wherever we are, God calls us to be an active part of his family making a difference through out prayers and actions… across the Anglican Communion we have enormous opportunities to show God’s love in practical ways and see lives transformed.”

The magazine includes a focus on Fiji and how the church has been standing alongside those affected by Cyclone Winston, which hit the region in February killing 44 people and leaving hundreds homeless. Chief Executive Officer of the Anglican Missions Board, the Revd Canon Robert Kereopa explained how their three-phased emergency plan was being rolled out now offering temporary shelters and trauma counseling for the victims.

Ways to help the church be more inclusive of people with disabilities features in an article about a workshop in Rwanda for representatives from East and Central Africa. Anglican Alliance Relief and Progammes Manager, Dr Janice Proud helped organize the event. “People with disabilities make up 20% of the poorest of the poor… The most amazing thing for me was how those gathered for the workshop seemed to already be aware that they were not reaching people with disability in their work, and they were ready to explore how to adapt their practice and resources to ensure that it was sensitive to and inclusive of people with disabilities,” she said.

This issue also includes a story from Athens about how churches in the city have come together in response to the migrant crisis, supporting vulnerable families with advice and basic supplies.

While other features include the church response to a deadly virus, looking at Ebola in Africa and Zika in South America and an item from Cyprus about how people are making new spiritual journeys on an island steeped in Christian history and tradition.

For these and further articles you can subscribe to Anglican World by clicking here or view a preview of the magazine on line here.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Anglican Communion News Service, Daily update from the Anglican Communion News Service on Monday 31st May 2016

Resource offers pastoral approaches to physician assisted dying

Posted on: June 9th, 2016 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Links
Photo: Shutterstock

The Faith, Worship, and Ministry Task Force on Physician Assisted Dying has released a new resource reflecting changes in the legal status of physican assisted dying in Canada. Photo: Robert Kneschke/Shutterstock.com

Resource offers pastoral approaches to physician assisted dying

Email this to someoneTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook25

Eighteen years after the release of Care in Dying, a document produced by the Anglican Church of Canada which sought to provide a theological perspective on physician assisted dying, and 16 months after the Supreme Court of Canada struck down its previous ban on the practice, the church has released a new resource reflecting the changed legal situation in Canada.

Produced by the Faith, Worship, and Ministry Task Force on Physician Assisted Dying, In Sure and Certain Hope: Resources to Assist Pastoral and Theological Approaches to Physician Assisted Dying is available online and offers new perspectives on palliative and pastoral care among others, and provides prayer and liturgical resources.

Unlike Care in Dying, which argued against any change in public policy and recommended that church members “not seek recourse to euthanasia and assisted suicide,” In Sure and Certain Hope does not attempt to argue for or against physician assisted dying.

“Whatever we might think about physician assisted dying, it’s part of the legal landscape in Canada,” said the Rev. Canon Eric Beresford, task force chair.

“The question is no longer simply is this right or wrong,” he added. “The question is, pastorally, how do we care for people in this new situation?”

Archbishop Fred Hiltz, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, praised the resource while acknowledging that it did not provide a “yes/no, black-and-white” perspective on physician assisting dying.

“A report like this is not going to please everybody because it doesn’t give a direct answer, and that will frustrate some people,” the Primate said. “But as the report comes out, to give a direct answer is in fact to alienate people over a very sensitive and complex issue.”

He highlighted the use of the term “covenant of presence,” where pastoral caregivers and family members walk with individuals who may be contemplating assisted dying, regardless of their own views.

Following that perspective, the theological section of the resource aims to support what Beresford calls “generous pastoral practice,” going beyond the personal views of clergy on the appropriateness of assisted dying and helping them find a range of responses to whatever decision their parishioners may make, addressing issues such as suffering, intentionality, conscience, dignity, and hope.

The Rev. Dr. Eileen Scully, director of Faith, Worship, and Ministry and principal staff to the task force, said the new resource was designed to raise questions about faith, pastoral presence, and how caregivers can make a difference in society by offering pastoral care to the dying.

“It’s a complex situation … When it comes down to it all, we have a duty to care for each other,” Scully said. “We have a duty to care especially for the vulnerable. We have a duty to care for the dying. We are to accompany people particularly in the dying process.”

One thing that has changed little since the publication of Care in Dying in 1998 is what Beresford calls the “very patchy provision” of palliative care aimed at relieving suffering, which is not always available in Canada and often undertaken in a tertiary care context.

As a result, In Sure and Certain Hope continues to highlight the importance of palliative care that is compassionate and holistic, “facilitative and permissive rather than prescriptive,” and ensures that patients have a real choice.

Potentially the most controversial section pertains to pastoral care, where clergy must be present to bring God’s love and compassion to the dying or terminally ill, in some cases putting their own views aside.

“What the document is saying is that to pass judgement and to refuse to provide care because the person is making a decision we disagree with is, in fact, moral abandonment,” Beresford said. “It’s exactly the opposite of care … Care involves, not denying our views, but living in the tension of our views in relationship to another.

“It involves being present to the other, even when that’s uncomfortable, in the view that ministering the presence of God and the compassion of God is in fact the way that hearts and lives are shaped—not by claiming to pronounce the judgement of God.”

To provide approaches to pastoral care, the task force drew on the experiences of Anglicans such as the Rev. Canon Douglas Graydon, who has provided end-of-life care throughout his vocation.

For 14 years, Canon Graydon served as the chaplain at Casey House Hospice in Toronto during the early years of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, a time when assisted dying was a “constant conversation” among those suffering from AIDS.

“Young men were dying in catastrophic ways, generally abandoned by families, and so they wanted to maintain some kind of control over their lives,” he recalled.

“Of course, [assisted dying] couldn’t happen because it was—is—illegal. But within that culture and all those years of having conversations around it, it certainly helped me come to my own personal views as to where assisted dying rests within the Christian frame of thinking.”

Members of the task force describe In Sure and Certain Hope as adding to Care in Dying, rather than replacing it. They are currently working on two accompanying study pieces: a series of church bulletin inserts dealing with questions on dying and pastoral care, and a Lenten study guide that would provide the framework for a five-week discussion on the issues.

Archbishop Hiltz emphasized the accessibility of In Sure and Certain Hope, which was commended at the last meeting of CoGS in March, to all Anglicans.

“It’s written by theologians and pastoral caregivers, but it’s written in such a way that every person in the Anglican Church of Canada could read this,” the Primate said, adding, “I regard it as a gift to the church at this time.”

View or download the resource.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Anglican Church of Canada, News from General Synod, June 09, 2016

Anglican World magazine showcases global church family

Posted on: June 8th, 2016 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Links

Anglican World Magazine
Photo Credit: ACNS

[ACNS by Rachel Farmer] The global family of the Anglican Communion in action is showcased in the latest edition of Anglican World out this week.

It features stories of churches working to tackle hardship, disease, injustice and homelessness. Writing in the magazine, Secretary General of the Anglican Communion, Archbishop Josiah Idowu-Fearon, said, “Wherever we are, God calls us to be an active part of his family making a difference through out prayers and actions… across the Anglican Communion we have enormous opportunities to show God’s love in practical ways and see lives transformed.”

The magazine includes a focus on Fiji and how the church has been standing alongside those affected by Cyclone Winston, which hit the region in February killing 44 people and leaving hundreds homeless. Chief Executive Officer of the Anglican Missions Board, the Revd Canon Robert Kereopa explained how their three-phased emergency plan was being rolled out now offering temporary shelters and trauma counseling for the victims.

Ways to help the church be more inclusive of people with disabilities features in an article about a workshop in Rwanda for representatives from East and Central Africa. Anglican Alliance Relief and Progammes Manager, Dr Janice Proud helped organize the event. “People with disabilities make up 20% of the poorest of the poor… The most amazing thing for me was how those gathered for the workshop seemed to already be aware that they were not reaching people with disability in their work, and they were ready to explore how to adapt their practice and resources to ensure that it was sensitive to and inclusive of people with disabilities,” she said.

This issue also includes a story from Athens about how churches in the city have come together in response to the migrant crisis, supporting vulnerable families with advice and basic supplies.

While other features include the church response to a deadly virus, looking at Ebola in Africa and Zika in South America and an item from Cyprus about how people are making new spiritual journeys on an island steeped in Christian history and tradition.

For these and further articles you can subscribe to Anglican World by clicking here or view a preview of the magazine on line here.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Anglican Communion News Service,  Daily update from the ACNS on Monday 31st May 2016

General Synod greener, more accessible with new app

Posted on: June 6th, 2016 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Links

The General Synod 2016 app is now available for tablets, mobile phones, and through the web for desktop.

The General Synod 2016 app is now available for tablets, mobile phones, and through the web for desktop.

General Synod greener, more accessible with new app

Email this to someoneTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook55

The 41st General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada will be the most accessible and environmentally friendly yet, thanks to a specially designed web and mobile app that will connect delegates to each other while offering a window into the proceedings for Anglicans across Canada and the general public.

All delegates will be provided with tablets at the forthcoming General Synod, which takes place from July 7-12 in Richmond Hill, Ont. at the Sheraton Parkway North. Users can access the app on an Apple iPhone or iPad, Android Phone or Tablet, or through the web at a desktop computer or Blackberry.

The General Synod 2016 app contains the Convening Circular and all the information that delegates will need for the meeting. An event guide includes pre-Synod travel help, reports, resolutions, orientation videos, the Handbook of General Synod, a list of members and special guests, and a convenient search tool.

The Rev. Peter Wall, chair of the General Synod Planning Committee, said the app would allow General Synod to be “as green as we can be and as environmentally friendly as we can be,” while highlighting its ease of access.

“If it works the way we want it to—and I think it’s going to—it’s going to be a whole lot easier for members of General Synod to access information, to know what’s going on that day, that hour, [and] to be able to communicate with other members of General Synod without trying to stand up and find them at a table,” Wall said.

“Because it’s an app that lives in the Internet, other members of the church across the country will be able to access the same information,” he added. “It means that what we’re doing will be that much more accessible to the church. It means that we’re going to have a whole lot less paper floating around the meeting hall … I think it’s win-win all the way around.”

The app is customized for each member of General Synod with a personalized agenda, schedule, and interactive maps that tell users where they need to be.

“If you are a clergy member from the diocese of Saskatchewan and are on a specific sessional committee—say, nominations—the app will be set up in such a way that it presents the agenda for you, which will be different than a lay member from Quebec who is not on any sessional committees,” said web manager Brian Bukowski, who played a leading role in developing the app.

A major feature of the app is the facilitation of communication between members of General Synod through a members-only section that allows them to send messages and arrange meetings. Members can also write notes and take photos, sending them to others or sharing them on social media.

Worship is one area where the app will play less of a role than originally planned, with the primary resource at General Synod being a worship booklet with music that will be used in conjunction with PowerPoint.

“We are using a paper resource for worship,” worship committee chair the Rev. Martha Tatarnic said. “Partly that’s so that there is a take-home element, because there was some disappointment at the last joint assembly that there wasn’t a resource to take home. But it’s also [that] we just ultimately assessed that this is going to make it easier for people to sing.”

That said, she added, “Certainly we’ll be using the app in all of the ways that it’s intended to be used, for communication between members [and] for sharing updates with the wider assembly.”

Download the General Synod 2016 app.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Anglican Church of Canada, News from General Synod, June 01, 2016

Book helps exploration of Holy Land

Posted on: May 27th, 2016 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Links

The revised “Land of Promise?” is now available to download or to purchase from the Anglican Communion online shop.

[ACNS] An updated version of the book “Land of Promise?” has been published to help people delve deeper into Christian attitudes to the Holy Land and Zionism.

The Travellers’ Guide to Land of Promise?” includes stories and exercises designed to appeal to anyone who wants to engage more with the issues, whether they are preparing to go on a pilgrimage, studying at theological college or looking for material for a house group to work through.

“We wanted to make the book more experiential,” explained the guide’s author, Stuart Buchanan. “The aim is to get into people’s perception, to meet them where they are and help them explore issues together.

The book can be bought through the Anglican Communion’s online shop or downloaded for free (pdf).

Land of Promise?” was produced by NIFCON – the Anglican Communion Network for Inter Faith Concerns – in 2012 following discussions at ACC-14 three years earlier.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Anglican Communion News Service, Daily update from the Anglican Communion News Service on Friday 27 May 2016

Find a Church website offers handy reference for Anglicans, Lutherans

Posted on: May 17th, 2016 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Links

A collaboration between the Anglican Church of Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, the Find a Church website allows users to instantly find the closest Anglican or Lutheran church in their area.

A collaboration between the Anglican Church of Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, the Find a Church website allows users to instantly find the closest Anglican or Lutheran church in their area.

Find a Church website offers handy reference for Anglicans, Lutherans

Email this to someoneTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook42

Locating an Anglican or Lutheran church anywhere in Canada is quicker and easier than ever thanks to a convenient new website.

A joint venture between the Anglican Church of Canada (ACC) and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC), findachurch.ca uses a simple interface to help users instantly find a church near them or in an area where they plan on travelling.

Web manager Brian Bukowski, who played the leading role for the Anglican church in developing the new site, said the idea evolved out of talks with ELCIC communications director Trina Gallop Blank.

While the ACC had long floated the idea of a church locator for Anglicans, the ELCIC had its own church-finding website which was then in need of redevelopment.

“She and I had a conversation and there it became clear that we were both looking for a solution,” Bukowski said.

The Rev. Dr. Larry Kochendorfer, bishop of the Synod of Alberta and the Territories and a member of the Joint Anglican Lutheran Commission (JALC), praised the joint website as a “great and visible sign” of the full communion partnership between the two churches.

“The fact that you can search for Anglican and Lutheran congregations at the same time opens up a whole breath of possibilities,” Kochendorfer said.

He noted that someone looking for an ACC congregation in an area not served by an Anglican church can, “in a very Full Communion way,” locate a Lutheran church in the same area, and vice versa.

The evolution of the website, he added, further reflected that communal spirit.

“The Lutherans have had a Find a Congregation online resource for quite some time now,” Kochendorfer said. “It was great that the ELCIC site could provide the starting point for the new joint Find a Church resource.

“By working collaboratively between the two national offices, my understanding is they were able to streamline the process and provide enhancements to the resource that would mutually benefit the wider Anglican and Lutheran communities.”

With the findachurch.ca domain donated from the Anglican diocese of Ontario, the new site was built from scratch to meet modern web standards, accessible on phone, tablet and desktop alike.

The landing page features a search box in which users can type an address, postal code or the name of a church, with the option of bringing up Anglican churches, Lutheran churches or both.

Search results will pull up a list of churches with each entry containing a street address, mailing address, contact information and map. Users who wish to narrow their results can also use the Advanced Search option, which allows them to search by province, diocese, synod or by using keywords.

An additional feature, Find a Person, is currently available only for the ELCIC, but may be expanded in what Bukowski refers to as “Phase 2” of the website rollout.

To ensure information is accurate and up-to date, users may contact the web manager at any time to request changes and offer feedback—with the latter helping to further develop the site as new features are added.

“We know that as it’s being used, people will use it in new and interesting and creative ways and have ideas to improve it,” Bukowski said.

“We’ll find weaknesses to it and we’re very much open to hear what people think, both in the positive and what could be changed to make it improved, because we see it as a living site.”

Visit the Find a Church website.

 

Is your church information correct at findachurch.ca? We rely on dioceses and individual churches to help us keep the information up-to-date. Please have a look for your congregation at findachurch.ca and let us know if you find any errors or wish to add information. You can do this by either clicking the Update and Correct button at the bottom of each entry or by emailing [email protected]  You can also send photos of your congregation to add to the site through https://www.hightail.com/u/anglican.  

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Anglican Church of Canada, Info! News from General Synod, May 02, 2016

Jerusalem Sunday and the ties that bind

Posted on: April 29th, 2016 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Links
The Penman Medical Clinic, located in Zababdeh in the West Bank, is one of the most prominent ministries of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem. As part of its annual Jerusalem Sunday celebrations, the Anglican Church of Canada collects donations to help support the clinic.

The Penman Medical Clinic, located in Zababdeh in the West Bank, is one of the most prominent ministries of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem. As part of its annual Jerusalem Sunday celebrations, the Anglican Church of Canada collects donations to help support the clinic.

Jerusalem Sunday and the ties that bind

Email this to someoneTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook21

For the Rev. Canon Richard LeSueur, the meaning of Jerusalem Sunday was encapsulated in a letter he received from Archbishop Michael Peers, then-Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, while living in Jerusalem during the First Intifada.

“We would go to bed at night and we would hear gunfire echoing off the Mount of Olives,” recalled LeSueur, who was teaching at St. George’s College at the time. “It was a tremendously stressful time. There were a lot of military vehicles then and many incidents that were occurring, and you feel so far away.”

Currently on the advisory council of the Canadian Companions of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem, LeSueur was moved to tears by the letter from Archbishop Peers, which he said included the following words: “You are not forgotten. You are being remembered by your church a long way away, and we are holding you in our prayers.”

“That’s why we do Jerusalem Sunday,” LeSueur said. “And that’s why we have Companions of Jerusalem—because it means so much when they know that we have not forgotten them, and we are praying for them and we care about them.”

May 8, 2016 marks the third Jerusalem Sunday, an annual day set aside by the Anglican Church of Canada to celebrate its companionship in God’s mission with the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem, which includes congregations in Jerusalem, Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria.

LeSueur, who recently resigned his position as rector of St. George’s Anglican Church in Cadboro Bay, B.C. to devote himself full-time to speaking about Jerusalem, the Companions of Jerusalem, and Jerusalem Sunday, noted the biblical precedent set by St. Paul, who devoted a significant portion of his letters to collections for the church in Jerusalem.

Paul, LeSueur said, “cared deeply and was deeply committed to ensure that the needs of the Christian community in Jerusalem were supported, and really, we’re carrying on that. There is a church there and we can learn from them and we can also support them.”

A wide range of resources are available online for parishes and congregations to celebrate Jerusalem Sunday, including sermon­­ notes, prayers, liturgical resources, photos, and information on the diocese.

Jerusalem Sunday 2016 will see a number of new resources make their debut. Chief among them is the launch of a Facebook page for the Companions of Jerusalem, where weekly stories about the diocese of Jerusalem are posted. New exegetical notes, a bulletin cover, and new story inserts are also available.

Along with praying for the diocese of Jerusalem, a major part of Jerusalem Sunday is collecting money to support its ministries—in particular the Penman Medical Clinic, a primary care facility in the West Bank town of Zababdeh. Run by the parish of St. Matthew, the Penman Clinic provides subsidized, affordable care to the surrounding population of 20,000 in Zababdeh and surrounding villages.

Archbishop Suheil Dawani, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem, has explained the central role of the Penman Clinic for the diocese by noting Jesus’s work in healing the sick. Through collections from Jerusalem Sunday, the Anglican Church of Canada has helped support the clinic, raising more than $14,000 during one particular year.

“Even if we can only send a small amount of money to support an initiative in a remote rural area south of Nazareth in a medical clinic … even that small gesture means so much,” LeSueur said.

Anglicans can support the Penman Clinic through a special gift from parish offerings or Gifts for Mission. Offerings can also be sent by cheque—made out to the “Anglican Church of Canada” with “Jerusalem Sunday Penman Clinic” written in the notes—to:

Jacqueline Beckford
Resources for Mission
Anglican Church of Canada
80 Hayden Street
Toronto, ON
M4Y 3G2

View a complete list of resources for Jerusalem Sunday.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Anglican Church of Canada, News from General Synod, April 28, 2016