Archive for the ‘Features’ Category

N.T. Wright: On Palm Sunday, Jesus rides into the perfect storm

Posted on: April 14th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

 

On Palm Sunday, Jesus rides into the perfect storm

Australian Broadcasting Corporation: As he rode into Jerusalem, Jesus believed that he was embodying the divine hurricane, says N.T. Wright.

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, April 14, 2014

 

The ‘Gospel of Jesus’s wife’ is real: what now?

Posted on: April 14th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

The ‘Gospel of Jesus’s wife’ is real: what now?

The Atlantic: Historians, engineers, and linguists have pored over a three-inch piece of papyrus that makes mention of Jesus’s wife. What does this discovery actually mean?

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, April 11, 2014

José Casanova: Globalization and the growing church

Posted on: April 14th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

José Casanova: Globalization and the growing church

The global church is one in which Christians are both connected to and conscious of other faiths and denominations, says a Georgetown scholar of religion.

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas,  April 11, 2014

Welby explains gays and violence in Africa remarks

Posted on: April 9th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

By Marites N. Sison

 

 

Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and Archbishop Fred Hiltz met for two hours at the convent of  Sisters of St. John the Divine in Toronto. Photo: Michael Hudson 


 

After a 12-hour day of back-to-back engagements, a jet-lagged Justin Welby, the 105th Archbishop of Canterbury, sat down for a 15-minute interview with the Anglican Journal late Tuesday evening, April 8. 

Welby and his wife, Caroline, arrived in Toronto Monday afternoon for a one and a half day “personal, pastoral visit,” his first, to the Anglican Church of Canada. Welby, whose area of expertise includes conflict resolution, has said that these visits are part of a process for getting to know the primates (senior archbishops) and their churches. The Anglican Communion, which has been struggling with divisions over the issue of sexuality, has about 80 million members in 143 countries. Including Canada, the archbishop has visited 17 of the Communion’s 37 provinces and aims to visit them all by the end of the year or early 2015. He arrives today in Oklahoma City, to visit The Episcopal Church.

Excerpts:  
 
Q: How would you describe your first visit to the Anglican Church of Canada? What have you learned about this church that has been most unexpected?

 
A: Two things have been unexpected, that have been striking. One is the depth of commitment to the truth and reconciliation process, which I didn’t realize quite how deep that went into the life of the church. And, also, the commitment of the church to support the Council of the North dioceses…That’s all part of the same sense of commitment to those who the church has damaged or who are on the edge. The other thing that’s struck me has been the commitment to the Five Marks of Mission and that these are very much part of the strategy of the church, and that’s the vision of the church.
 
Q: You mentioned in your dinner remarks that your conversation with the primate, Archbishop Fred Hiltz, has been most useful in terms of how to move forward in the Communion.

A: We had two hours together and I find him a particularly helpful, thoughtful and challenging interlocutor, and someone who seems to be able to unlock and unpick issues that were weighing on my mind and to…enable more creativity. I don’t know if that’s part of his life as primate, but I felt that, as a result of the conversation, I was more creative than I was before it.

Q: Could you give us a sense of what you talked about? 
 

A: There were these obvious things. We talked about the challenge of diversity in the Communion, that we have such breathtaking diversity across the Communion, that it’s a massive task to even think about how we can relate to each other effectively. We talked quite a lot about the companion dioceses and the value they are…the depth they get into.
 
Q: In 2016, the church’s General Synod will be presented with a resolution changing the marriage canon to allow same-sex marriage. Is this a cause for concern?
 
A: That’s a really tough question. Well, it’s got to be a cause for concern because this is a particularly tough issue to deal with…And, I hope that two or three things happen: I hope that the church, in its deliberations, is drawing on the wealth of its contribution to the Anglican Communion and the worldwide church, to recognize…the way it works and how it thinks, to recognize the importance of its links. And that, in its deliberations, it is consciously listening to the whole range of issues that are of concern in this issue. We need to be thinking; we need to be listening to the LGBT voices and to discern what they’re really saying because you can’t talk about a single voice anymore than you can with any other group. There needs to be listening to Christians from around the world; there needs to be listening to ecumenical partners, to interfaith partners. There needs to be a commitment to truth in love and there needs to be a commitment to being able to disagree in a way that demonstrates that those involved in the discussions love one another as Christ loves us. That’s the biggest challenge, that in what we do, we demonstrate that love for Christ in one another.
 
Q: Some people have reacted strongly to your statements about the issue of gay marriage in your interview with LBC radio.
A: Lots of people have.
 
Q: Were you in fact blaming the death of Christians in parts of Africa on the acceptance of gay marriage in America?
 
A: I was careful not to be too specific because that would pin down where that happened and that would put the community back at risk. I wouldn’t use the word “blame”— that’s a misuse of words in the context. One of the things that’s most depressing about the response to that interview is that almost nobody listened to what I said; they mostly imagined what they thought I said…It was not only imagination, it was a million miles away from what I said.
 
Q: So what exactly were you saying?

 

A: What I was saying is that when we take actions in one part of the church, particularly actions that are controversial, that they are heard and felt not only in that part of the church but around the world…And, this is not mere consequentialism; I’m not saying that because there will be consequences to taking action, that we shouldn’t take action. What I’m saying is that love for our neighbour, love for one another, compels us to consider carefully how that love is expressed, both in our own context and globally. We never speak the essential point that, as a church, we never speak only in our local situation. Our voice carries around the world. Now that will be more true in some places than in others. It depends on your links. We need to learn to live as a global church in a local context and never to imagine that we’re just a local church. There is no such thing.
 
Q: You’ve said the issue of same-sex marriage is a complex one that you wrestle with every day and often in the middle of the night…

 
A: I have about a million questions. I think really I’ve said as much as I want to on that subject.
  
Q: You recently released a video collaboration with Cardinal Vincent Nichols. What was the impetus for that?

A: It came about in the discussions we were having together. We meet together to discuss and pray quite regularly and out of that came the sense that we ought to do something public and visible that demonstrated what the church is already doing, to draw attention to that and that we’re centered both in prayer and social action. 

 
Q: Is there an Easter message you’d like to give to Canadian-Anglicans?

 

A: I would say that at the heart of my own thinking as we approach Easter is to recall the joy that is in the risen Christ.
 
Q: Is it harder for you now to be on Twitter because you’re the Archbishop of Canterbury?

 

A: Yes.
 
Q: Are you less candid?
 

 

A: I’m not necessarily less candid. It’s very interesting with social media, isn’t it? Every day I get loads of questions directed at me through a Twitter message—everything from “What’s your favourite book?” to “Are you really saying…whatever?” Sadly, there’s really no way I can respond to those—it’s just impossible. I would do nothing else all day, and then I wouldn’t get through it. One of the things I find difficult is ignoring responses to things that are tweeted because everything in me wants to respond to the people who’ve responded to me. But it’s just not possible. The other thing is that you just become aware of the dark side of all these things: that people feel that they can write things about other people, and not just about myself, which are really horrible. And so I have to say there are moments when you think, “I just don’t know if I want to put up something on social media because it will just unleash a torrent of abuse from some people.” But in the end you think, “Well, I won’t read it…there’s no point… I’m just going to get on with life.”
 
Q: Do you still compose your own tweets?

 

A: Yes.
 
Q: You don’t have a minder doing that for you?
 

 

A: No, no. I said it’s got to be authentic. It’s got to be me; that’s why there are sometimes gaps. I’ll go through a few days where nothing particularly occurs to me or I’m traveling. I’m not on Twitter today—I might just manage it today before I go to sleep. Some days, lots of things happen; other days, my mind is a perfect blank…
 
Q: You also need to be kind to yourself.
A: I do know about that, but you at least have to know when you’re going to bore people stiff.
 
 
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Anglican Journal News, News from General Synod, April 9, 2014

Sustainable Design

Posted on: April 6th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

 

Sustainable Design

Leaders often equate sustainability with money, and focus on short-term fundraising at the expense of long-term strategy. But how does one design a sustainable institution?

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, April 4, 2014

Transformative Leadership: An Overview

Posted on: April 5th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

 

Transformative Leadership: An Overview

Transformative leaders equip people to advance the church’s mission.

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, April 2, 2014

Churches use Lent season to raise awareness on climate change

Posted on: April 5th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

 

Churches use Lent season to raise awareness on climate change

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Anglican Communion News Service [ACNS], April 4, 2014

 

 

 

Sustainable Design: An Overview

Posted on: March 30th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

Sustainable Design: An Overview

The vibrancy of an institution depends on its sustainability over time.

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, March 28, 2014

‘Our apology hasn’t been empty’

Posted on: March 25th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

By Marites N. Sison 
 
 
 

“There have been so many people over the years who have worked really hard to establish good relationships between indigenous and non-indigenous people,” says Anglican Healing Fund co-ordinator Esther Wesley. “Our [church] apology hasn’t been empty.” Photo: Marites N. Sison 


 

Over time, in so many different places and at different times, Anglican Healing Fund co-ordinator Esther Wesley kept hearing people refer to “apologies, empty apologies” whenever they talked about issues related to the sad legacy of Indian residential schools in Canada.

During a recent conference call, when someone again used the phrase “empty apologies” and added, “i.e., the government,” Wesley wondered: “Does that include us?” The Anglican Church of Canada and other churches had apologized, after all, ahead of the federal government, for the harms inflicted by the system in which more than 150,000 aboriginal children were removed from their homes and sent to residential schools across the country. The Anglican church operated over 30 of these schools across Canada, and many former students have reported sexual, physical and emotional abuse.

What Wesley heard bothered her. “We can’t keep going like this. We just can’t, because there have been so many people over the years who have worked really hard” to establish good relationships between indigenous and non-indigenous people,” she thought. “Our apology hasn’t been empty.”

Wesley thought of people within the Anglican Church of Canada—indigenous and non-indigenous—who worked quietly behind the scenes to change what had been, for many centuries, an unjust and unequal relationship. She also thought of how the church has offered close to $6 million for projects that promote healing and reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous Anglicans.

And yet, judging from the “empty apologies” remark, Wesley realized many people were unaware of what the church has been doing to atone for the past. Clearly, something had to be done.

Names and events came to mind, and Wesley thought of a timeline poster that would trace the evolution of the relationship between indigenous people and the Anglican church in Canada. The Healing Fund had published timeline posters about the history of residential schools, and these were always popular at Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) events: the posters were handy, easy to read and would often elicit discussions.

With approval and support from the primate, Archbishop Fred Hiltz, and the general secretary, Archdeacon Michael Thompson, the “Timeline of an evolving relationship” was produced. A copy will presented by the primate as a gesture of reconciliation at the last TRC national event in Edmonton, March 27 to 30.

Wesley—with help from Nancy Hurn (General Synod archivist), John Bird (former General Synod staff, now special assistant to the primate on residential schools), Henriette Thompson (public witness co-ordinator for social justice) and Saskia Rowley (Anglican Journal art director/General Synod graphics and print production manager)—produced the timeline.

The timeline “really is to honour those who have worked hard in creating these new relationships,” said Wesley. Certain people stood out and they were invited to cite what they considered to be highlights in the indigenous and non-indigenous Anglican relationship: Chris Hiller (former indigenous justice co-ordinator), Ellie Johnson (former director of the partnerships department), Donna Bomberry (former indigenous ministries co-ordinator), the Rev. Canon Laverne Jacobs (former indigenous ministries co-ordinator), National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald, and Bird.

Comprehensive and laden with powerful images, text, quotes and graphics, the timeline begins with a brief background about the arrival of Anglicans on Turtle Island (now known as North America) in the 1400s and how they brought not only their Bibles but their beliefs of superiority known as the Doctrine of Discovery. The doctrine, which the Anglican church eventually repudiated in 2010, decreed that “non-Christian nations have no rights to their land and sovereignty…” The doctrine continues to underpin “many national laws and policies in the nation states that have emerged from the European colonial process,” and is still cited by courts in Canada, the United States, Australia and New Zealand “to justify rule over indigenous lands,” said the timeline.

 

Key moments and turning points in the church’s history with indigenous people— both good and bad—are highlighted. One reads, for instance, about the establishment of the first Anglican residential school (1828), and over 30 years later, the start of training and support for indigenous ministries along the Yukon River by the Rev. Robert McDonald (1862). 

The year 1967 marked a change in the relationship, stated the timeline, citing how the church would, over the years, pass hundreds of resolutions supporting indigenous struggles for recognition of traditional land rights, treaty implementation and consultations. The turning point, said Wesley, came with the publication in 1969 of Beyond Traplines, a report prepared by sociologist Charles Hendry, who was commissioned by the church to examine its relationship with aboriginal peoples. Hendry, whose report included first-hand accounts by former residential school students, urged the Anglican church to develop a new partnership with indigenous peoples based on “solidarity, equality and mutual respect.”

 

Changes would not come fast, however, and the timeline illustrates how, in many instances, they came as a result of the actions of people—both indigenous and non-indigenous within the church—and not the institution itself, said Wesley.

For Hurn, the timeline allows Canadian Anglicans to “think and look at the joint journey.” It is also a chance to recognize “the indigenous people who have worked in the Anglican church over time to bring the good news to their people in spite of many things—the Doctrine of Discovery, the residential schools.”

Hurn echoed Wesley’s assessment that “there isn’t much known about what we’ve been able to do together over time.” The growth of the relationship “doesn’t make up for what was done in the residential schools,” she added, “but it’s still an important piece of it.”

In Hurn’s opinion, the timeline’s underlying message is this: “Before we can move forward in reconciliation, we have to understand our shared history.”  

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Anglican Journal News, March 25, 2014

 

Cardboard cathedral designer wins top prize

Posted on: March 25th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

 

Cardboard cathedral designer wins top prize

 

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Anglican Communion News Service [ACNS], March 25, 2014