Archive for the ‘Features’ Category

Two ministers forge friendship across a church divide

Posted on: April 21st, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

Two ministers forge friendship across a church divide

The New York Times: The two ministers were foes before they ever met, partisans in a war they did not start, but partisans nonetheless.

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, April 21, 2014

 

 

The ultimate self-help book: Dante’s ‘Divine Comedy ’

Posted on: April 21st, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

The ultimate self-help book: Dante’s ‘Divine Comedy ’

Everybody knows that “The Divine Comedy” is one of the greatest literary works of all time, Rod Dreher writes in The Wall Street Journal. What everybody does not know is that it is also the most astonishing self-help book ever written.

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, April 21, 2014

 

 

Justin Welby: the hard-nosed realist holding together the Church of England

Posted on: April 21st, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

Justin Welby: the hard-nosed realist holding together the Church of England

The (London) Guardian: Justin Welby now looks like the best archbishop of Canterbury the Church of England could possibly have.

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, April 21, 2014

 

 

Laura Everett: Serving an institution is my ministry

Posted on: April 18th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

Laura Everett: Serving an institution is my ministry

Inherited traditions show how institutions can serve a similar function as liturgies, giving us patterns to hold our longing. For one Christian leader, that tradition was the “yelling mailbox.”

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, April 10, 2014

 

 

The Book of Common Prayer is still a big deal

Posted on: April 18th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

  

The Book of Common Prayer is still a big deal

Christianity Today: Alan Jacobs explains why the nearly 500-year-old Anglican prayer book retains its influence, and why it should appeal even to (non-Anglican) evangelicals.

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, April 10, 2014

 

 

A journey like no other

Posted on: April 17th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

 

                                                                                                        Lutheran Church Charities/Tim Hetzner


This article first appeared in the April issue of the Anglican Journal

 

By Herbert O’Driscoll

You are exhausted and surrounded by an almost palpable fear.

You feel a wave of sadness because of all places, you associate this house, here in Bethany, with warmth, security and friendship.

You recall the last week or two, the shocking intensity of public reaction after the episode with Lazarus. You had to leave the city area, but friends kept you apprised of the furor. The Sanhedrin had met and branded you a national threat. The high priest himself had called for your execution as an urgent political necessity.

Yet you knew that the time for staying away was over. Against their will, you took the faithful group east across the hills to the Jordan Valley road. You spent a couple of nights along the way, using the precious hours to share some reflections. It was the long way back to Bethany, but the safest…down through Jericho and over the valley floor, to the Roman army road that climbed the escarpment then dropped into the village.

That was two days ago. Yesterday, you and the group came here, to the only safe house you have now. Tonight, Martha has given a dinner for the group. But even her warmth and vivaciousness can’t overcome the sense of foreboding.

Suddenly, the gathering falls silent. Mary, the quiet one, the introvert, gets up, crosses the room, takes a small jar and moves toward you. Calmly, she pours oil on your head.

There is a wild outbreak of reactions. One voice cuts across the group, that of Judas—dismissive, sneering, cynical.

You are desperately trying to get a grip on your feelings. You know Mary’s act is no sentimental or hysterical gesture. You know this sensitive, quiet woman has exposed the deep, unnamed fears of everyone in the room. Her action forces you to name what you know must be faced. “Leave her alone,” you say. “She bought it so that she might keep it for the day of my burial.” Death now sits at the table.

Thirty-five years later, writing his book on Patmos, John will remember this moment. He will remember your last week and the journey you must now take through its terrible days and nights.

Sometime in the wakeful hours of the night, you decide to make the first move. You leave the house just after sunrise and walk around the south shoulder of the mountain until the city faces you. It clings to the jagged hills, like an animal at bay, waiting to spring. Later in the morning they bring you the pathetic donkey; the first ragged cheers ring out. Step by scrambling step, you move down onto the stage of the cosmic drama. Crowds cheer and curse you; your body is tensed for the first blow or flung stone.

That night, you return to Bethany, exhausted.

Each day you continue this rhythm. From Bethany to the city, and back; from friendship to confrontation; from public exposure to sleepless hours.

There is constant confrontation now. You can feel the agony of friends, who helplessly watch you. You know very well the rising murmur behind official doors. You are aware a net is closing, but you have decided there is no other way.

Thursday, you book the room, because otherwise it may be too late  to share the meal. But there is a terrible difference from the customary tradition. This may be the king’s feast, but on this night, the king is himself the meal, his blood the wine—your body, your blood.

Out into the night. First, you feel paralyzing fear, then an extraordinary sense of peace. Night becomes day. Faces appear and recede; voices rise and fall, spitting questions, abuse, charges. There are the torches of Herod’s atrium of lechery and decadence, and later the clink of iron on stone in Pilate’s city headquarters.

Now comes the dawn, the shrieking, endless tunnel of the crowds, a sense of falling through blood and pain, lashes and cruel laughter. Familiar voices call and fade, until you are thrown like an animal and the butchery begins. You hang in the blazing sun until the sky mercifully clouds over. And though you call and scream, even God seems no longer with you.

*  *  *

No one can dare walk with you now into the shadowlands. There will be a dawn of terror and glory. The world will split asunder, and death itself will die. Those who love you will weep until their tears turn to joy by the lakeside where they first met you. You will invite them to a simple meal, as once again you invite us to the joy of our Eastertide.
HERBERT O’DRISCOLL, former dean of Christ Church Cathedral in Vancouver, is a well-known preacher and author of many popular books on the spiritual life and Bible interpretation. He lives in Victoria, B.C.

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Anglican Journal News, April 17, 2014

 
 

 

 

 

N.T. Wright: On Palm Sunday, Jesus rides into the perfect storm

Posted on: April 14th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

 

On Palm Sunday, Jesus rides into the perfect storm

Australian Broadcasting Corporation: As he rode into Jerusalem, Jesus believed that he was embodying the divine hurricane, says N.T. Wright.

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, April 14, 2014

 

The ‘Gospel of Jesus’s wife’ is real: what now?

Posted on: April 14th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

The ‘Gospel of Jesus’s wife’ is real: what now?

The Atlantic: Historians, engineers, and linguists have pored over a three-inch piece of papyrus that makes mention of Jesus’s wife. What does this discovery actually mean?

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, April 11, 2014

José Casanova: Globalization and the growing church

Posted on: April 14th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

José Casanova: Globalization and the growing church

The global church is one in which Christians are both connected to and conscious of other faiths and denominations, says a Georgetown scholar of religion.

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas,  April 11, 2014

Welby explains gays and violence in Africa remarks

Posted on: April 9th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Features

 

By Marites N. Sison

 

 

Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and Archbishop Fred Hiltz met for two hours at the convent of  Sisters of St. John the Divine in Toronto. Photo: Michael Hudson 


 

After a 12-hour day of back-to-back engagements, a jet-lagged Justin Welby, the 105th Archbishop of Canterbury, sat down for a 15-minute interview with the Anglican Journal late Tuesday evening, April 8. 

Welby and his wife, Caroline, arrived in Toronto Monday afternoon for a one and a half day “personal, pastoral visit,” his first, to the Anglican Church of Canada. Welby, whose area of expertise includes conflict resolution, has said that these visits are part of a process for getting to know the primates (senior archbishops) and their churches. The Anglican Communion, which has been struggling with divisions over the issue of sexuality, has about 80 million members in 143 countries. Including Canada, the archbishop has visited 17 of the Communion’s 37 provinces and aims to visit them all by the end of the year or early 2015. He arrives today in Oklahoma City, to visit The Episcopal Church.

Excerpts:  
 
Q: How would you describe your first visit to the Anglican Church of Canada? What have you learned about this church that has been most unexpected?

 
A: Two things have been unexpected, that have been striking. One is the depth of commitment to the truth and reconciliation process, which I didn’t realize quite how deep that went into the life of the church. And, also, the commitment of the church to support the Council of the North dioceses…That’s all part of the same sense of commitment to those who the church has damaged or who are on the edge. The other thing that’s struck me has been the commitment to the Five Marks of Mission and that these are very much part of the strategy of the church, and that’s the vision of the church.
 
Q: You mentioned in your dinner remarks that your conversation with the primate, Archbishop Fred Hiltz, has been most useful in terms of how to move forward in the Communion.

A: We had two hours together and I find him a particularly helpful, thoughtful and challenging interlocutor, and someone who seems to be able to unlock and unpick issues that were weighing on my mind and to…enable more creativity. I don’t know if that’s part of his life as primate, but I felt that, as a result of the conversation, I was more creative than I was before it.

Q: Could you give us a sense of what you talked about? 
 

A: There were these obvious things. We talked about the challenge of diversity in the Communion, that we have such breathtaking diversity across the Communion, that it’s a massive task to even think about how we can relate to each other effectively. We talked quite a lot about the companion dioceses and the value they are…the depth they get into.
 
Q: In 2016, the church’s General Synod will be presented with a resolution changing the marriage canon to allow same-sex marriage. Is this a cause for concern?
 
A: That’s a really tough question. Well, it’s got to be a cause for concern because this is a particularly tough issue to deal with…And, I hope that two or three things happen: I hope that the church, in its deliberations, is drawing on the wealth of its contribution to the Anglican Communion and the worldwide church, to recognize…the way it works and how it thinks, to recognize the importance of its links. And that, in its deliberations, it is consciously listening to the whole range of issues that are of concern in this issue. We need to be thinking; we need to be listening to the LGBT voices and to discern what they’re really saying because you can’t talk about a single voice anymore than you can with any other group. There needs to be listening to Christians from around the world; there needs to be listening to ecumenical partners, to interfaith partners. There needs to be a commitment to truth in love and there needs to be a commitment to being able to disagree in a way that demonstrates that those involved in the discussions love one another as Christ loves us. That’s the biggest challenge, that in what we do, we demonstrate that love for Christ in one another.
 
Q: Some people have reacted strongly to your statements about the issue of gay marriage in your interview with LBC radio.
A: Lots of people have.
 
Q: Were you in fact blaming the death of Christians in parts of Africa on the acceptance of gay marriage in America?
 
A: I was careful not to be too specific because that would pin down where that happened and that would put the community back at risk. I wouldn’t use the word “blame”— that’s a misuse of words in the context. One of the things that’s most depressing about the response to that interview is that almost nobody listened to what I said; they mostly imagined what they thought I said…It was not only imagination, it was a million miles away from what I said.
 
Q: So what exactly were you saying?

 

A: What I was saying is that when we take actions in one part of the church, particularly actions that are controversial, that they are heard and felt not only in that part of the church but around the world…And, this is not mere consequentialism; I’m not saying that because there will be consequences to taking action, that we shouldn’t take action. What I’m saying is that love for our neighbour, love for one another, compels us to consider carefully how that love is expressed, both in our own context and globally. We never speak the essential point that, as a church, we never speak only in our local situation. Our voice carries around the world. Now that will be more true in some places than in others. It depends on your links. We need to learn to live as a global church in a local context and never to imagine that we’re just a local church. There is no such thing.
 
Q: You’ve said the issue of same-sex marriage is a complex one that you wrestle with every day and often in the middle of the night…

 
A: I have about a million questions. I think really I’ve said as much as I want to on that subject.
  
Q: You recently released a video collaboration with Cardinal Vincent Nichols. What was the impetus for that?

A: It came about in the discussions we were having together. We meet together to discuss and pray quite regularly and out of that came the sense that we ought to do something public and visible that demonstrated what the church is already doing, to draw attention to that and that we’re centered both in prayer and social action. 

 
Q: Is there an Easter message you’d like to give to Canadian-Anglicans?

 

A: I would say that at the heart of my own thinking as we approach Easter is to recall the joy that is in the risen Christ.
 
Q: Is it harder for you now to be on Twitter because you’re the Archbishop of Canterbury?

 

A: Yes.
 
Q: Are you less candid?
 

 

A: I’m not necessarily less candid. It’s very interesting with social media, isn’t it? Every day I get loads of questions directed at me through a Twitter message—everything from “What’s your favourite book?” to “Are you really saying…whatever?” Sadly, there’s really no way I can respond to those—it’s just impossible. I would do nothing else all day, and then I wouldn’t get through it. One of the things I find difficult is ignoring responses to things that are tweeted because everything in me wants to respond to the people who’ve responded to me. But it’s just not possible. The other thing is that you just become aware of the dark side of all these things: that people feel that they can write things about other people, and not just about myself, which are really horrible. And so I have to say there are moments when you think, “I just don’t know if I want to put up something on social media because it will just unleash a torrent of abuse from some people.” But in the end you think, “Well, I won’t read it…there’s no point… I’m just going to get on with life.”
 
Q: Do you still compose your own tweets?

 

A: Yes.
 
Q: You don’t have a minder doing that for you?
 

 

A: No, no. I said it’s got to be authentic. It’s got to be me; that’s why there are sometimes gaps. I’ll go through a few days where nothing particularly occurs to me or I’m traveling. I’m not on Twitter today—I might just manage it today before I go to sleep. Some days, lots of things happen; other days, my mind is a perfect blank…
 
Q: You also need to be kind to yourself.
A: I do know about that, but you at least have to know when you’re going to bore people stiff.
 
 
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Anglican Journal News, News from General Synod, April 9, 2014