Archive for the ‘Computers’ Category

People for whom one cellphone isn’t enough

Posted on: April 5th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Computers

 

People for whom one cellphone isn’t enough

With work and home lives more intertwined than ever, some people are trying to maintain a clear line between the two by carrying two cellphones, the Wall Street Journal reports. With pictures of the children on one device and emails to the boss on the other, having two phones creates an extra layer of privacy.

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, April 2, 2014

Selfies bring ashtags to Lent

Posted on: March 8th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Computers

 

Selfies bring ashtags to Lent

Wall Street Journal: Christians embrace, and debate, a modern show of faith’s place on Ash Wednesday.

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, March 6, 2014

Massive open online forces

Posted on: February 14th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Computers

 

Massive open online forces

The Economist: The rise of online instruction will upend the economics of higher education.

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, February 12, 2014

 

Southern Africa archbishop launches Africa e-reader project

Posted on: February 3rd, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Computers

By ACSA media team, with additional reporting by Bellah Zulu

The Archbishop of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa (ACSA) has launched a new e-reader project to “promote electronic learning in dioceses in the Western Cape and at the Province’s principal residential college for ordinands”.

The Most Revd Dr Thabo Makgoba launched the new initiative when he opened and blessed a new Centre for Reflection and Development at his official residence and offices in Cape Town, on January 28.

During the opening ceremony, Archbishop Makgoba said, “We’re continuing a tradition of a passion for education. We [the Church] have played a pioneering role in South African education, from as far back as the 19th century.”

In this project students will be supplied with electronic readers or tablet computers to give them access to webcast lectures from Bishopscourt and other venues. They will also be able to download readings as well as log into the electronic academic library resources.

The Revd Godfrey Walton is the inaugural director of the project. He said, “In the first phase of the project, students from College of the Transfiguration (COTT) and students and ordinary church members from four dioceses in the Western Cape will be covered.”

He added, “In later phases, we plan to extend the project to cover the Church in the rest of southern Africa, and then to the whole continent.”

Archbishop Makgoba recounted the education history of the country and how the Church has been involved as a pioneer. He said, “In the 1980s, Bishopscourt established one of the country’s first electronic bulletin boards, used by Archbishop Tutu to circumvent hostile media reporting during the anti-apartheid struggle.”

“It was here too that my predecessor, Archbishop Njongonkulu Ndungane, conceptualised and started the Historic Schools Restoration Project to revitalise schools, [which] played a pioneering role in educating black pupils,” he said.

The Archbishop was grateful for the support the Church in Southern Africa has received from the Compass Rose Society, the Anglican Communion Office, Trinity Church Wall Street, the Motsepe Foundation and The Archbishop Thabo Makgoba Development Trust.

Currently, most theological colleges in the African continent have under-resourced libraries and the “e-reader project will serve as a major electronic resource for students and clergy involved in academic reading and research.”

Despite having challenges like many other Africa countries, education standards in South Africa are comparatively high and according to research, South Africa compares well with international standards.

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Anglican Communion News Service, [ACNS],  January 31, 2014

 

The nine commandments of Twitter

Posted on: January 27th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Computers

 

The nine commandments of Twitter

The (London) Guardian: Church of England issues new heavenly directives governing Christians’ use of social media, including “Thou shalt not rush in.”

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, January 24, 2014

Harvard Bible edX course ‘Early Christianity: The Letters of Paul’ draws 22,000 students from 180 countries — and counting

Posted on: January 24th, 2014 by CEP Administrator 2 Comments
Computers

 

Harvard Bible edX course ‘Early Christianity: The Letters of Paul’ draws 22,000 students from 180 countries — and counting

The Huffington Post: Online course has been called the largest and most concentrated scholarly discussion of Biblical studies in history.

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, News & Ideas, January 23, 2014

Digital disciples

Posted on: January 14th, 2014 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Computers

Read this story

A Lutheran pastor in Pennsylvania uses social media to engage youth in the ancient teachings of the church, a reflection of his deep belief that God is everywhere, including online. Read more »

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Leadership Education at Duke Divinity,  January 14, 2014

Heidi Campbell: The Internet challenges and empowers religious institutions

Posted on: December 16th, 2013 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Computers

Q&A: Technology

Heidi Campbell: The Internet challenges and empowers religious institutions

The digital culture isn’t changing religion as much as it is reflecting offline shifts in Christian life, says a scholar of religion and media at Texas A&M University. Read more » _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Leadership Education at Duke Divinity, Faith & Leadership, November 19, 2013

Church of England boosts digital presence with new app

Posted on: December 5th, 2013 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Computers

Sunday Worship presents the full Bible readings for the main Sunday service

Sunday Worship presents the full Bible readings for the main Sunday service.

 

[Church of England] The Church of England has released a new app to help more people to follow Sunday services using their mobile devices.

Sunday Worship (a new app for iPad/iPhone) presents the full Bible readings for the main Sunday service, together with the collect and post-Communion prayers for the week in a simple and elegant way, using the award-winning Common Worship design.

This follows two other apps published to support congregations in their devotional lives:

For those seeking a daily pattern of Bible reading, prayer and inspiration, Reflections for Daily Prayer was also launched Nov. 28 and is available on the Google Play Store for Android devices, after seeing over 50,000 downloads since its launch for iPad/iPhone.

The Lectionary — a key tool for clergy and worship leaders, providing them with the Bible readings for every service and full details of feast days and other information — is also available this year for the first time as an iPad/iPhone app, Kindle ebook or as a printed booklet.

The apps have been developed by Church House Publishing (the official publisher of the Church of England) with Aimer Media, a Brighton-based developer that has developed acclaimed apps for a number of other religious publishers among many others.

Thomas Allain-Chapman, publishing manager for Church House Publishing comments: “The new digital resources we are offering this year will, I hope, make this new Church year just a little bit easier for clergy and parishes. Sunday Worship is designed to make it simple for anyone to find out what’s coming up in church this Sunday, to prepare well for taking part in worship and perhaps also revisit the Bible readings and prayers during the rest of the week, too.”

Adrian Driscoll, commercial director of Aimer Media, adds: “We’ve had great feedback from ministers about how our apps make Bible reading and service planning that bit easier – and we’re excited to open up these benefits to even more people through the Android version.”

All three Church House Publishing/Aimer Media iPad/iPhone apps — Sunday Worship, The Common Worship Lectionary and Reflections for Daily Prayer — are all available now on iTunes and details can be found here http://www.chpublishing.co.uk/features/our-apps

Reflections for Daily Prayer is also available from Google Play Store for Android devices.

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Episcopal News Service, December 5, 2013

Social Media as Community

Posted on: November 14th, 2013 by CEP Administrator No Comments
Computers

 

When I see the way my students communicate with one another through social networking, I wonder how I ever survived college without a smart phone (or knowing what that was!) For them, social networking has not created a new need which students before them didn’t have; it fills an old need in a new way.  In particular, I have noticed that the large, modern university is no match for the small liberal arts college when it comes to building community. Large class sizes, highly competitive fields, and increasing numbers of commuters and distance students creates an environment where it is difficult to find a place to belong and people to belong to. Often, students “do community” via social networking using the same content but different methods as they did when I was in school: they share ideas, plan projects, and exchange movies or recipes. They create insiders and outsiders (as every community does).

Yet social networking as community has its limits. There are the usual critiques: it tends to be consumer-driven and highly individualistic (just think of the newly-coined term, “selfie”). The deeper problem which prevents social media from becoming a fuller form of community, however, is its lack of rootedness. As (primarily) postmoderns, students are longing to be connected to a story bigger than themselves. They tend to move regularly, change jobs often, and be generally disconnected from the traditions of their heritage, finding that meaning and belonging continually escape them as circumstances change (in sociological terms, they lack a metanarrative).

Fortunately, the Church has been in the business of creating story, rootedness, and belonging for nearly two millennia. We know exactly what people are looking for in social networking and should therefore be able to see its many strengths- as well as its weaknesses. Our churches can be the places where these students come to ask the bigger questions of meaning and belonging they aren’t getting answered on their twitter feeds. What do you think it would look like to receive an entire generation coming from this context? As I’ve mentioned before, they don’t tend to share their parents’ personal hang-ups with the Church, but they have no time for anything they perceive as “fake.” What they’re looking for is an experience of meaning that can show them where they’ve come from and where they’re going. And that is exactly the story of our faith!

About Allison Chubb

Allison Chubb is a chaplain at St. John’s College at the University of Manitoba and a youth coordinator for new Canadians in downtown Winnipeg. She is particularly interested in how youth engage what Robert Webber called “ancient-future worship,” those rituals of old practiced in a postmodern context where a new generation finds itself searching for rootedness. She describes herself as “paid to hang out with God and hang out with people.” On the side she loves to create by cooking, gardening, crafting, and balloon-sculpting.

 
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Anglican Church of Canada, Info! News from General Synod, November 1, 2013